Time(EST) Temperature Dew Relative Wind Wind Wind Quality Solar Precipitation Fuel 10 hr Fuel Battery
Point Humidity Speed Gust Direction control Radiation accumulated Temperature Moisture voltage
F F %  mph  mph  W/m*m  in F  gm  volt
22:25 61 34.5 37 7 16 WNW OK 0 6.42 58 8 12.8
21:25 64 36.5 36 11 17 NW OK 0 6.42 60 8 12.9
20:25 67 39.2 36 10 23 NW OK 21 6.42 64 8 13
19:25 70 43.2 38 12 22 WNW OK 144 6.42 68 8 13.2
18:25 72 43.6 36 12 22 W OK 306 6.42 74 8 13.4
17:25 71 42 35 13 23 W OK 257 6.42 72 7 13.4
16:25 74 43.8 34 16 26 W OK 699 6.42 80 8 13.7
15:25 74 45.3 36 13 23 W OK 469 6.42 81 8 13.8
14:25 72 40.5 32 13 25 W OK 769 6.42 76 7 13.7
13:25 74 41.4 31 12 23 W OK 945 6.42 83 8 14
12:25 71 41.2 34 10 21 WSW OK 923 6.42 81 8 14
11:25 69 38.7 33 8 16 WSW OK 834 6.42 79 8 14
10:25 68 40.7 37 6 12 WSW OK 713 6.42 79 8 14
9:25 64 44.5 49 9 14 WSW OK 546 6.42 73 9 13.9
8:25 60 46.5 61 6 10 WSW OK 349 6.42 68 10 13.1
7:25 54 45.9 74 4 7 WSW OK 137 6.42 55 14 12.7
6:25 47 43.6 88 3 5 WSW OK 19 6.42 44 14 12.6
5:25 45 41.7 88 3 5 W OK 0 6.42 42 13 12.6
4:25 48 37.2 66 0 7 WSW OK 0 6.42 44 12 12.6
3:25 53 40.7 63 4 7 WNW OK 0 6.42 47 11 12.6
2:25 56 37.1 49 6 12 WNW OK 0 6.42 52 10 12.6
22:25 58 37.9 47 5 8 WNW OK 0 6.42 53 9 12.8
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Bruce Peterjohn and I started our Hundred on the Hook day for May at 2:00 am this morning with a slight breeze blowing and no moon. Our night birding was spent along Broadkill Road with our second bird of the night being a Black Rail (second only to a very loud Northern Mockingbird). We finished out the rest of the night-time birding with American Bittern, Black-crowned and Yellow-crowned Night-Herons, King and Virginia Rails, Sora, Barn Owl, Great-horned Owl, American Woodcock, Chuck-will's Widow, and Whip-poor-will. Besides the night-times birds we also picked up a flyover Black-billed Cuckoo. With the sun starting to rise we said goodbye to the last of the calling American Bitterns and headed into the Headquarter's Area, stopping at the Pine Grove Trail area to hear several Barred Owls calling. On the way to the Boardwalk Trail we stopped at the gate to the old maintenance area and saw the refuge Coyote. While there we also picked up several good warblers, Magnolia, Black-throated Blue, Bay-breasted, Blackpoll, American Redstart (the first of many for today), Wilson's and Canada Warbler. Several Wild Turkeys, Northern Bobwhites, and an Eastern Screech Owl were also calling at this time as well.

The Boardwalk Trail and parts of the Dike Trail were not as active and we only picked up Eastern Phoebe, Northern Waterthrush, Chimney Swift. As we were leaving the parking lot we picked up a Bobolink sitting on the wires in front of the new maintenace building. We then picked up a calling Horned Lark and Prairie Warbler calling along the entrance Road. After a brief stop at Turkle Pond, where we picked up a Pileated Woodpecker, Veery and a Swainson's Thrush, we headed out of the Headquarter's Area to Deep Branch were we found 3 Grasshopper Sparrows.

After Deep Branch we headed to the State Wildlife Area to conclude our morning songbird agenda, with the highlights being Northern Parula, Blackburnian, and additonal Canada Warblers. With the sondbird agenda complete, and the winds picking up we began our marsh birding for the day with a calling Common Moorhen along Prime Hook Road (at the curve pulloff), along with a Northern Pintail, Glossy Ibis and White-rumped Sandpiper. At Prime Hook Beach we picked up an adult Lesser Black-backed Gull, along with some Ruddy Turnstones, a single Red Knot, and Sanderling. With lunch approaching we decided to head to Broadkill Road to see if the Wilson's Phalarope was still present. Unfortunately there were very few shorebirds present so we headed off to the Broadkill Mall for lunch at 11:30am with 138 species for the day. (BTW, the Broadkill Mall, at the end of Broadkill Road, has great sandwiches.)

While eating lunch at the Broadkill Mall, Bruce kept a watch over the migrating swallows and picked out a Cliff Swallow in with some Bank Swallows. Fortunately for me the Cliff Swallow was in a good position in the flock so Bruce was able to get me on the bird quickly. Not a bad way to enjoy your lunch.

After lunch we worked our way west along Broadkill Road picking up Solitary Sandpiper, Willow Flycatcher, Willet, Least Tern, and Eastern Meadowlark. Stopping for one more look at the shorebirds in the impoundment Bruce spotted the Wilson's Phalarope cruising along the water's edge catching flies. In the saltmarsh area we picked up Nelson's and Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrows, additional Seaside Sparrows, and a late Savannah Sparrow.

With 149 species for the day, and just about at our self-imposed limit for the day, we headed off to Fowler Beach to hopefully pick up some Black Skimmers that were spotted there on Saturday. But as could be expected, when we got there there were no Skimmers to be found. Fortunately for us, eight Black Skimmers were soon spotted flying just over the dunes. Upon leaving Fowler Beach we found a Red-shoulder Hawk.

We then headed up to the Slaughter Beach tidal flats, but few birds were present so we ended our day at 2:00pm with a total of 151 species. Biggest misses were Least Bittern, Stilt Sandpiper, and Summer Tanager. This outing brought our cumulative 'Hundred on the Hook Day' total for the year to 215 species.