Time(EST) Temperature Dew Relative Wind Wind Wind Quality Solar Precipitation Fuel 10 hr Fuel Battery
Point Humidity Speed Gust Direction control Radiation accumulated Temperature Moisture voltage
F F %  mph  mph  W/m*m  in F  gm  volt
23:25 67 62.7 86 10 16 E N/A 0 28.86 66 20 12.6
22:25 67 63 87 10 16 E N/A 0 28.86 65 20 12.6
21:25 67 63 87 10 16 E N/A 0 28.86 66 19 12.7
20:25 67 63 87 9 15 E N/A 0 28.86 66 17 12.8
19:25 68 63.3 85 12 16 E N/A 25 28.86 68 15 12.9
18:25 69 63.6 83 12 17 E N/A 146 28.86 69 13 13.1
17:25 71 64.9 81 12 18 E OK 347 28.86 77 11 13.3
16:25 72 65.1 79 12 20 E OK 514 28.86 82 11 13.5
15:25 73 66.1 79 14 20 ESE OK 655 28.86 82 11 13.6
14:25 74 65.2 74 12 18 E OK 739 28.86 86 10 13.7
13:25 75 67.3 77 11 16 E OK 764 28.86 87 11 13.8
12:25 74 67.4 80 10 16 ENE OK 730 28.86 87 11 13.8
11:25 74 68.8 84 10 15 E OK 589 28.86 86 12 13.8
10:25 73 68.9 87 8 12 ENE OK 470 28.86 82 14 13.6
9:25 72 69.2 91 6 11 ENE OK 320 28.86 80 16 13.5
8:25 68 66.5 95 5 9 ENE OK 125 28.86 72 26 12.8
7:25 66 64.2 94 3 5 NW OK 19 28.86 66 26 12.6
6:25 63 61.2 94 3 4 WSW OK 0 28.86 60 26 12.5
5:25 63 60.9 93 2 7 WNW OK 0 28.86 60 26 12.6
4:25 65 62.6 92 4 6 W OK 0 28.86 63 26 12.6
3:25 65 62.3 91 4 6 WSW OK 0 28.86 62 26 12.6
2:25 65 62 90 4 8 W OK 0 28.86 63 24 12.5
1:25 65 61.7 89 4 6 WSW OK 0 28.86 63 24 12.6
0:25 67 63.3 88 4 7 WSW OK 0 28.86 64 22 12.6
22:25 68 63 84 2 7 WSW OK 0 28.86 65 18 12.6
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Bruce Peterjohn and I started our Hundred on the Hook day for September at 4:30 am this morning with a zero breeze blowing, a bright moon, and a whole lot of mosquitoes. We started our night birding at Petersfield Ditch on Broadkill Road, with Bobolinks, a Swainson's Thrush and a Veery calling overhead. Not expecting much more, we moved up to the entrance gate to listen for owls and we were rewarded with a Barred Owl, and 2 Eastern Screech Owls. We then returned to Broadkill Road to watch the sun come up near Petersfield Ditch and picked up Great-horned Owl, Green Heron, Black-crowned Night-Herons, and several calling Soras. Did I mention that there were a whole lot of mosquitoes in the marsh area.

With the sun starting to rise we headed into the Headquarter's Area. The Boardwalk Trail had a fair amount of migrants as we picked up White-eyed and Red-eyed Vireo, Tennessee, Magnolia, Black-throated Blue, Pine, Blackpoll, Black-and-white, Prothonotary, and Canada Warblers, plus American Redstart, Ovenbird, Common Yellow throat, and Yellow-breasted Chat. Our next stop was the State Wildlife Area, but before we did this we made a quick run down Prime Hook Road, and picked up 40 Snow Geese, most of our puddle ducks, two more Black-crowned Night-Herons, a Common Moorhen, both Yellowlegs, a Ruddy Turnstone, and a Black Tern. Back at the State Area we had a Red-shouldered Hawk just as we entered the woods. The woods themselves were alive with migrants, and we picked up Chestnut-sided, Black-throated Green, and Blackburnian Warblers, along with a good number of the birds seen earlier. Just as we were leaving and getting back into the truck Bruce picked up a Philadelphia Vireo. We also had an Acadian Flycatcher. With the exception of the Flycatcher, all of the birds seen were at the very beginining of the woods.

With lunch approaching our plan was to make a quick run down Fowler Beach Road to check the recently planted farmland for shorebirds and then head up to the Slaughter Beach Tidal Flats. The initial view of the farmland at the gate didn't look promising as the Winter crop was getting rather tall and we only saw a handfull of birds. But when we moved down the road to get a better view of the lower portion of the field that was recently floaded, we began to pick up a few Semipalmated Plovers and Sandpipers. We then picked up a single Buff-breasted Sandpiper and followed by an interesting Godwit that didn't quite look right. Not long after we got on the bird it flew, but neither of us picked up any black in the underwind so we didn't think it was a Hudsonian. Having lost the bird in flight flying into the marsh area, we headed down to the end of the road and picked up an adult Hudsonian Godwit feeding with some Gulls and Terns. But this bird didn't match the description of the bird we had seen in the farmland. With very little shorebird habitat available at Fowler Beach, we headed up to the Slaugther Beach Tidal Flats to see if our bird moved up there, but the flats were floaded with the recent high tides so no habitat was available. A quick scan of the bay across the street from the flats yielded 3 Least Terns. With the time approaching 1:00 pm, we decided to head off to the Broadkill Mall for lunch with a lunch-time total of 119 species.

After picking up lunch we checked out the impoundments along Broadkill Road, but like the rest of the refuge very little shorebird habitat existed. The habitat that did exist was mostly in tall grass so very few birds were visible outside of in flight. We then returned to Fowler Beach Road to the farmland and were able to relocated the Godwit that we had seen earlier in the day and give it a name, Hudsonian. Also present were 4 Buff-breasted and several Baird's Sandpipers. Further down the road in the impoundments, we picked up a few White-rumped Sandpipers. A quick return to Prime Hook Road yielded a Pied-billed Grebe at the curve pulloff. We also made a quick return to Broadkill Road and we were rewarded with a Black Vulture, a flyby Merlin, and some Short-billed Dowitchers.

With 4:30 pm approaching we decided to finish the day birding the Broadkill Saltmarsh were we picked up Clapper Rail, Willet, Seaside Sparrow, and Boat-tailed Grackle. We ended the day at 5:00 pm with 128 species for the day at Oyster Rocks Road with Willet being our final bird. Biggest misses were Killdeer, and Common Grackle.

This outing brought our cumulative 'Hundred on the Hook Day' total for the year to 237 species. While we added 8 new species to our list today (Hudsonian Godwit, Baird's Sandpiper, Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Black Tern, Philadelphia Vireo, Tennessee Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler), we dropped Gadwall, Killdeer, Swamp Sparrow, and Common Grackle from our 'All Trip' list, bringing it's total down to 40 species.