Time(EST) Temperature Dew Relative Wind Wind Wind Quality Solar Precipitation Fuel 10 hr Fuel Battery
Point Humidity Speed Gust Direction control Radiation accumulated Temperature Moisture voltage
F F %  mph  mph  W/m*m  in F  gm  volt
22:25 53 53 100 1 4 WNW OK 0 2.25 51 19 12.7
21:25 54 54 100 2 4 SW OK 0 2.25 51 17 12.7
20:25 54 52.9 96 2 4 SE OK 0 2.25 51 15 12.8
19:25 58 55.4 91 4 6 ENE OK 1 2.25 56 13 12.9
18:25 61 55.1 81 5 9 E OK 68 2.25 59 12 13.1
17:25 64 55.5 74 7 11 ESE OK 256 2.25 66 10 13.4
16:25 65 55.4 71 7 11 E OK 426 2.25 74 10 13.6
15:25 67 54.8 65 5 12 ENE OK 570 2.25 75 10 13.7
14:25 67 55.3 66 5 14 NE OK 668 2.25 77 10 13.8
13:25 67 56.5 69 10 16 ENE OK 693 2.25 75 11 14
12:25 66 57.1 73 6 11 NE OK 574 2.25 73 11 13.7
11:25 65 56.5 74 6 13 NE OK 577 2.25 73 12 13.9
10:25 64 56.6 77 8 14 NE OK 444 2.25 69 14 13.7
9:25 63 56.7 80 8 16 NE OK 290 2.25 67 15 13.5
8:25 62 57.1 84 8 15 ENE OK 111 2.25 63 18 13
7:25 59 56.4 91 9 14 ENE OK 4 2.25 57 21 12.5
6:25 59 56.7 92 9 14 ENE OK 0 2.25 57 21 12.5
5:25 59 56.7 92 6 12 ENE OK 0 2.25 57 20 12.5
4:25 60 57.1 90 5 12 ENE OK 0 2.25 58 18 12.5
3:25 61 56.5 85 8 14 ENE OK 0 2.25 60 18 12.5
2:25 61 55.8 83 9 18 ENE OK 0 2.25 61 18 12.5
1:25 61 55.5 82 10 15 ENE OK 0 2.25 60 18 12.5
0:25 61 55.8 83 9 17 ENE OK 0 2.25 60 19 12.5
22:25 61 55.8 83 12 21 ENE OK 0 2.25 60 19 12.5
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[1]
Bruce Peterjohn and I started our Hundred on the Hook day for October at 5:00 am this morning with a healthy breeze blowing, a bright moon, and a whole lot fewer mosquitoes than our last outing. We started our night birding at Petersfield Ditch on Broadkill Road, with calling Snow and Canada Geese. Not expecting much more, we moved up to the entrance gate to listen for owls and after about a half hour we were rewarded with a Great-horned, Barred and Eastern Screech Owls. We then returned to Broadkill Road to watch the sun come up near Petersfield Ditch and picked up American Bittern, Black-crowned Night-Heron, good numbers of American Wigeon, and most of the other expected puddle ducks.

With the sun starting to rise we headed into the Headquarter's Area. On the way to the Boardwalk Trail we picked up Cooper's Hawk, Merlin and Northern Parula. The Boardwalk Trail had a few migrants with the following highlights: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Eastern Wood-Pewee, Eastern Phoebe, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Black-throated Blue and Yellow-rumped Warbler, American Redstart, and White-throated Sparrow. We then made a brief visit to the Pine Grove Trail area where we found a family of Wild Turkeys, and a small flock of birds that contained, Pine and Black-and-White Warblers, Brown Creeper and Golden-crowned Kinglets. On our way to the State Wildlife Area we stopped along Deep Branch Road and picked up some Black Vultures and a Peregrine Falcon. The State Area was for the most part quite, but we did pick up a Dark-eyed Junco.

The marsh area of Prime Hook Road was next and as we entered the marsh we had an adult Bald Eagle with good numbers of Snow and Canada Geese below it. A search through the Snow Geese yielded a single Cackling Goose. Several shorebirds where present near the curve pulloff, including Pectoral Sandpiper, Dunlin, Stilt Sandpiper, and Long-billed Dowitchers. Also present was a single Little Blue Heron. Prime Hook Beach itself yielded some Sanderlings and Semipalmated Plovers. On the drive north on Front Street, Bruce briefly spotted an Orange-crowned Warbler. On the way to Fowler Beach we picked up a Sharp-shinned Hawk along Cods Road and then stopped along Fowler Beach Road to check the recently planted farmland for shorebirds. The lower portion of the field was recently floaded and held good numbers of shorebirds, including both Yellowlegs, Semipalmated, Western, Least, Pectoral, and Stilt Sandpipers, along with both Dowitchers. Fowler Beach was rather quite yielding only a single Black-bellied Plover. With the time approaching 1:00 pm, we decided to head off to the Milton for lunch with a lunch-time total of 105 species.

After picking up lunch we headed to Oyster Rocks to enjoy our lunch while waiting for a Clapper Rail to call. We weren't disappointed as soon after we arrived one called. We also picked up a few Seaside Sparrows at the edge of the marsh while we were there. Next on the agenda was Broadkill Beach. Along the way we picked up a Yellow-billed Cuckoo sitting on the wires along Broadkill Road. Not much was in the marsh and impoundment, but we did locate a few Ruddy Ducks. A scan of the bay yielded no new birds so we started our way west and picked up a small group of sparrows that contained several White-crowned Sparrows and a Palm Warbler. With the recent high tides the salt marsh sparrows were at the edges of the marsh which helped us find both Nelson's and Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrows. On the way further west, just before the golf course, we found two Solitary Sandpipers feeding in the front lawn of a home.

At this point were were down on two 'All Trip' birds, Pileated Woodpecker and Rock Pigeon, so our efforts turned on finding these two species. Our luck turned our way quickly as Bruce spotted two Rock Pigeons flying south along Route 1. A drive along Deep Branch Road failed to yield our woodpecker, but it did yield a small group of Chipping Sparrows. So off we went for a return trip to the State Wildlife Area where we were immediately rewarded with a pair of Pileated Woodpeckers flying directly over our heads. With a half hour remaining before 5:00pm, we decided to make a quick run down to Prime Hook Beach to look over the flats at low tide. Along the way we picked up a pair of Fish Crows and a Common Moorhen (at the curve pulloff). We ended the day at 5:00 pm with 124 species for the day scanning the bay, picking up a Common Loon and a Surf Scoter. Biggest misses were Killdeer (second month in a row) and Ruddy Turnstone.

This outing brought our cumulative 'Hundred on the Hook Day' total for the year to 241 species. We added 4 new species to our list today (Peregrine Falcon, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Orange-crowned and Palm Warbler). For the first time this year we held steady on the 'All Trip' list at 40 species.