Time(EST) Temperature Dew Relative Wind Wind Wind Quality Solar Precipitation Fuel 10 hr Fuel Battery
Point Humidity Speed Gust Direction control Radiation accumulated Temperature Moisture voltage
F F %  mph  mph  W/m*m  in F  gm  volt
21:25 35 33.2 93 1 4 SW OK 0 5.21 31 13 12.7
20:25 35 31.2 86 2 4 WSW OK 0 5.21 32 12 12.8
19:25 35 30.7 84 0 3 SW OK 0 5.21 32 11 13
18:25 36 28.2 73 1 3 SSW OK 0 5.21 31 10 13.1
17:25 40 29.6 66 1 5 S OK 7 5.21 34 10 13.3
16:25 47 28.8 49 4 7 E OK 134 5.21 44 10 13.5
15:25 50 29.5 45 5 9 ENE OK 303 5.21 54 10 13.8
14:25 50 29.5 45 5 11 ENE OK 442 5.21 57 10 14
13:25 50 29.5 45 6 11 ENE OK 556 5.21 57 10 13.9
12:25 51 28.1 41 5 9 NNE OK 592 5.21 59 11 14.3
11:25 51 30.4 45 4 9 NNE OK 552 5.21 58 12 14.4
10:25 51 33.5 51 2 6 WSW OK 399 5.21 56 14 14.4
9:25 45 38.2 77 1 4 SW OK 196 5.21 48 16 13.3
8:25 39 35.8 88 2 4 SW OK 72 5.21 40 18 12.5
7:25 34 31.9 92 2 4 WSW OK 30 5.21 34 18 12.5
6:25 31 27.6 87 3 4 WSW OK 0 5.21 29 18 12.4
5:25 31 27.9 88 3 5 SW OK 0 5.21 29 17 12.4
4:25 32 29.1 89 3 4 SW OK 0 5.21 30 17 12.5
3:25 30 26.6 87 3 4 SW OK 0 5.21 28 16 12.5
2:25 30 27.7 91 3 4 SW OK 0 5.21 27 15 12.5
1:25 30 28.2 93 3 4 SW OK 0 5.21 27 15 12.5
0:25 30 26.9 88 2 4 SW OK 0 5.21 27 14 12.6
23:25 32 25.9 78 3 4 SW OK 0 5.21 28 12 12.6
21:25 33 26.6 77 3 4 WSW OK 0 5.21 30 12 12.7
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Bruce Peterjohn and I started our Hundred on the Hook day for November at 4:15 am this morning with a full moon, hardly a breeze, and not a mosquitoe to be seen or heard (as the temperature was 30 degrees). We started our night birding at Petersfield Ditch on Broadkill Road, with the first bird being a Rock Pigeon. Yes a Rock Pigeon, sitting on the side of the road on the bridge. Calling Snow Geese came in second, while a King Rail topped off the first three spots. With Winter birds arriving every day we decided to try for a Northern Saw-whet Owl, and were rewarded with a response to Bruce's tooting (along with a Great-horned Owl as well). Moving up to the entrance area we picked up a pair of Eastern Screech Owls, followed very quickly (as in seconds) by a Barred Owl. We then returned to Broadkill Road to watch the sun come up near Petersfield Ditch and picked up Tundra Swan, American Bittern, Virginia Rail, American Woodcock, Marsh Wren, American Wigeon, and most of the other expected puddle ducks.

With the sun starting to rise we headed into the Headquarter's Area. Along the entrance road we picked up our first Eastern Phoebe for the day. Highlights along the Boardwalk Trail included Wood Duck, Osprey, American Coot, Brown Creeper, Winter Wren (at the beginning of the new Blue Goose Trail), both Kinglets, Hermit Thrush, and 7 species of Sparrows, including Chipping, Field, and White-crowned Sparrow. We then made a brief visit to the Pine Grove Trail area where we found several Wood Ducks and Hooded Mergansers on Fleetwood Pond. As we were leaving the Headquarter's Area, and turning onto Route 16, we did a quick check of the Snow Geese in the field and found 2 Ross' Geese. Knowing that shorebirds were going to be difficult, we decided to make a quick run down Broadkill Road (at high tide) to look for shorebirds. With hopes fading, Bruce spotted a Great Egret and two Greater Yellowlegs along the road just as we came up to the Cedars. A review of the bay at Broadkill Beach yielded Lesser Scaup, Surf Scoter, Red-breasted Merganser, Ruddy Duck, both Loons, and several Northern Gannets.

On our way to the State Wildlife Area we picked up a Merlin along Deep Branch Road and a Pileated Woodpecker along Prime Hook Road. The State Area was for the most part quite, but we did pick up Red-shouldered Hawk, and a very late Gray-checked Thrush and a Common Yellowthroat.

The marsh area of Prime Hook Road was next and as we entered the marsh we had an young Bald Eagle in a large kettle of Turkey Vultures. A search through the Canada Geese failed to yield anything special. Prime Hook Beach itself yielded a single Canvasback in a flock of Green-winged Teals, a single White-winged Scoter, several Horned Grebes, a Great Cormorant, and several Black-bellied Plovers. We then headed north to Slaughter Beach where we added Black-crowned Night-Heron, Dunlin, Long-billed Dowitcher, Bonaparte's Gull, and Forster's Tern. With the time past noon, we decided to head off to the Milton for lunch with a lunch-time total of 108 species.

After picking up lunch we headed to Broadkill Road to enjoy our lunch while looking over several thousand Snow Geese in the south impoundment. Just as lunch was over we picked up a single Cackling Goose in the flock. We then began to look hard for shorebirds, and with the help of a Northern Harrier we were able to find Lesser Yellowlegs, Western , Least, and Pectoral Sandpiper. After some hard looking, the salt marsh then yielded Nelson's Sharp-tailed Sparrow, Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrow, and Seaside Sparrow. We then moved up to Fowler Beach for a bay watch, and we were not disappointed. Along Fowler Beach Road we found good numbers of American Pipits in the fields, and in the marsh area to the north of the road we found a single Wilson's Snipe. The bay watch began with an adult Lesser Black-backed Gull, followed by Black Scoter, Ring-necked Duck, Long-tailed Duck, Snow Bunting, an amazing flock of 13 Redheads, plus 3 others in flight (only second time I have seen them on the refuge), an even more amazing Gull-billed Tern, and a single female Common Goldeneye.

With daylight beginning to fade we then headed south to Oyster Rocks. Once there, we had several Clapper Rails calling and were able to spot two of them along the banks of the Broadkill River. With the sun just about set, Bruce spotted some Boat-tailed Grackles. We finished the day at 5:30 pm with a flyover Short-eared Owl for a total of 129 species (3rd highest behind May (151), and June & August (130)). Biggest misses were Greater Scaup and Horned Lark.

This outing brought our cumulative 'Hundred on the Hook Day' total for the year to 246 species. We added 5 new species to our list today (Redhead, White-winged Scoter, Gull-billed Tern, Short-eared Owl, and Gray-check Thrush). For the second month we held steady on the 'All Trip' list at 40 species.